Monday, April 06, 2009

Moygashel Linen

Moygashel linen is known throughout the world as the highest quality Irish linen one can buy. Moygashel is a small Irish village located on the outskirts of Dungannon in south Tyrone. The famous Moygashel Linen Mills were established there in 1795. It is said that Moygashel linen has a unique ingredient using the soft rainfall from the tributary streams on the Mourne Mountains to soften the flax. Sometime in the late 20th century, Moygashel built a new mill, and in 1993 the sight of the old mill was developed as Ireland's first outlet mall. Ulster Weavers Apparel Ltd. aquired Moygashel Linen in 2001.


In the 1940's, 50's and 60's Moygashel linen was available to purchase as yardage in fabric stores, as well as being used by designers and garment manufacturers. So well known was the Moygashel name, they had their own labels sewn into garments made from their fabrics. Some designers would also add the Moygashel name to their own labels.

Moygashel would take out full page ads in home sewing magazines as well as fine fashion magazines. The ad shown at the top of this post is from the 1954 Simplicity Spring Pattern magazine. Simplicity featured Moygashel linen in several of the garments made for the magazine, including the cover image shown above. Made from Simplicity pattern 4559 in peacock blue linen with red and white polka dot linen accents.

This dress is also Simplicity pattern 4559, made in Moygashel crease resistant linen.

This suit was made from Simplicity pattern 4550, also in Moygashel crease resistant linen.

Vintage Moygashel fabrics from the 1940's, 50's, and 60's are so highly prized, they sell for high prices when you can find them.

15 comments:

Deja Pseu said...

Isn't linen supposedly one of the strongest fibers next to silk? So items made from good linen will hold up well over time?

Couture Allure Vintage Fashion said...

I looked it up for you in my Textile textbook from school. Linen is actually made from flax and has the desirable characteristics of body, strength, and thick-and-thin fiber bundles which give texture to the woven fabric. It is one of the strongest of natural fibers. Don't confuse pure linen (flax) with fabrics that are woven to look like linen, such as rayons or synthetics.

fuzzylizzie said...

Moygashel is one of my favorite fabrics. I recently found a 1950s jacket - grey Moygashel with yellow leaves embroidered all over it. It was so lovely I bought it for myself, knowing full well that I cannot wear grey. I ended up reselling it and the buyer was thrilled with it.

Jody, do you know if the home sewer got a label with the purchase of Moygashel yardage?

Lizzie

Couture Allure Vintage Fashion said...

Lizzie, look at the swatch at the top of the Moygashel ad I posted, grey linen with little pink leaves embroidered all over it! Was that your fabric?

There is no indication in the ad that they gave out labels with their fabrics. That doesn't mean they didn't, though.

Bonjour Madame said...

I learn the most interesting things from your blog. Thanks!

Couture Allure Vintage Fashion said...

Thank you, Bonjour! I learned something today too while researching for this post.

Catwalk Creative said...

Fabulous article and very informative. Thank you!

superfox said...

I have a 'The K&P Model, Moygashel irish Linen blouse from 1950's in perfect condition. How much could I sell it for and who would buy it/ where would I sell it / Ebay??

DeeDee said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
DeeDee said...

I purchased Moygashel Linen from Joske's of Houston in the late 1960's. Does anyone else remember when many department stores sold fabric, patterns and notions? I received beautiful labels with Moygashel Linen embroidered in a flamboyant script with each yardage purchased. I was majoring in "Home Economics" at University of Houston and the linen was highly recommended by a Clothing and Textiles Professor. The linen is incredibly durable. I recently found two garments I made for my mother in 1970-71--she cannot bear to part with the beautiful fabric although the items no longer fit. Despite being forty years old the linen is in remarkable condition with vibrant color remaining. I wasn't aware of the continuing value of these vintage fabrics.

superfox said...

I have a mustard Moygachel linen blouse from sixty years ago. Does anyone want to buy it? My mum gave it to me but I actually don't really like it at all. although i like the craftsmanship.

clothesrack said...

Hi, I may be late to the party because I just found your site when I goggled MOYGASHEL LINEN. I just acquired a hot pink dress with the MOYGASHEL label but I am now wondering, such as another poster, if a label was provided when the linen fabric was purchased. The construction & workmanship in this dress, which is totally lined and intrically constructed, has a lot of slip stitch hand sewing (around the neck facing, front inside placket, hem) which is making me question if it in fact was hand fashioned by a very skilled seamstress. There is no store label in the dress. I intend to list it on EBAY but I want to be accurate in lising that it could very well we hand tailored. Any thoughts? Thanks for the vast wealth of knowledge on the subjec. Joci for NU4U2BUY

~Alison~ said...

This is a little out of date from the original post, but I just ran across the entry...
Fuzzylizzy asked if the home sewer received labels... They did.
I have quite a large stash of Moygashel Linen of my grandmothers dating back to the 40's and I have a ton of labels that came with the yardage from the department store where she shopped.
It makes for some beautiful garments! and home decor!

Couture Allure Vintage Fashion said...

Thanks for your input Alison!

Wendy Sacks said...

I was reading The Light Years by Elizabeth Jane Howard, which takes place in England in the late 1930s, and she mentions one of the characters having made a Moygashel suit. I'd never heard the term, though I'm fairly familiar with fabrics, so I was happy to see your blog post about it. Thanks.

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