Thursday, March 12, 2009

1937 Suits for Spring

The year is 1937. The Great Depression has lifted for most, and rumblings of war in Europe are just starting to be felt. The look for women is long and lean with wide shoulders. Skirt hems hit several inches below the knee and the silhouette is usually fitted to mid-thigh with subtle flare below that.

These suits were all featured in the February 3, 1937 issue of The New York Woman, a weekly women's magazine. The editorial states that a suit is de rigeur for Spring, a must-have for daytime, for travel, and for wearing in the country. Shown are the prices in 1937, and in parentheses what that same 1937 dollar translates to in 2009.

1937 suits for womenFrom left to right:

- Green shetland wool with a fitted peaked lapel jacket that has 4 slit pockets and a gored skirt. Sold at Franklin Simon for $22.95 ($348.00)

- Navy flannel with wide lapels, link buttons, and new moon pockets. Sold at Franklin Simon for $17.50 ($265.00)

- Rust-red homespun with fitted hipline, top-of-the-pleat pockets, and tassel buttons. Sold at Macy's for $33.95 ($515.00)

- Schiaparelli herringbone with wing-tucked collarless jacket. Copy at Saks Fifth Avenue for $39.95 ($606.00)

1937 suits for womenFrom left to right:

- Blouse styles have wide shoulders with puff sleeves, high necklines with ascots or draping. Pussy bows were also very popular at this time.

- Grey flannel jersey knit suit with a silk-lined, back belted cardigan and rib-knit skirt. Sold at Best for $39.95 ($606.00)

- Navy flecked Forstmann wool with green print blouse and matching scarf. Sold at Arnold Constable for $65.00 ($986.00)

- Muted green Daventree tweed with top-stitched belted jacket that has 4 flap pockets. Sold at Lord & Taylor for $49.95 ($758.00)

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2 comments:

Sal said...

I'm always fascinated to see the price equivalents in your posts. It's amazing to realize that prices have risen, but not CHANGED for wardrobe staples like suits.

Couture Allure Vintage Fashion said...

I was fascinated to find out that a Schiaparelli adaptation was far less expensive than a suit sold at the Arnold Constable department store.

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